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  • Cheapest States to Live

    This list recently came out on CNBC:

    https://www.cnbc.com/2021/07/15/thes...o-live-in.html

    These are America’s 10 cheapest states to live in for 2021

    • Rising prices for everything from meat to used cars are giving our wallets a kind of workout they haven’t seen in years.
    • The specter of inflation has many companies looking for locations where their workers — and their customers — have more spending power.
    • CNBC’s annual America’s Top States for Business study scores states based on an index of prices for basic items.
    The list is:

    10- Indiana
    8- Tennessee
    8- Georgia
    7- New Mexico
    6- Alabama
    5- Missouri
    4- Arkansas
    3- Oklahoma
    2- Kansas
    1- Mississippi

    Now, the entire premise this list flows from is so very flawed. Inflation? More buying power for their workers? The entire 3 key points of the article and its methodology is laughable, IMHO.

    Your thoughts?






  • #2
    Yeah, inflation is simply a regressive tax on the non-wealthy.

    I've priced out homes in TN, GA, MO and KS - that list tracks my experience. Only one that raised my eyebrows is New Mexico. Alburqueqe and Santa Fe (and their 'burbs) I've found were pretty pricey though, not sure about the rest of the state. I will say it's very beautiful country.

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    • #3
      I was offered a very lucrative job in TN. After visiting the location and the surrounding area, there is a reason I did not take the offer.

      There is a reason these places are cheap to live, and that is because there is no economy, school system, or services to speak of. This confirms with my findings in much of the southern parts of the US. The less urban you are, the worse it gets..... but also the cheaper it gets!

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      • #4
        My first gf in highschool grew up pretty poor in rural New Hampshire, so late 80s, early 90s. She had tales that I couldn't believe. Finding fresh raccoon roadkill was a treat because it meant dinner wasn't KD. Her uncle lived in a literal tin shack with a dirt floor. Kids were bathed in the creek.

        Yes, she had a raft of of issues directly related to a deprived childhood.

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        • #5
          I moved from PA to NY. PA has a lot lower taxes, but you could tell the difference in how well things are taken care of...

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          • Lord0fHats
            Lord0fHats commented
            Editing a comment
            You really can.

        • #6
          I live in Illinois. We didn't make the top 10. But two of our neighbors did. For years we have seen a loss in population because people keep moving to cheaper Indiana or Missouri. Even though they generally pay less and see much less public safety nets. Funny how once covid hit, everybody wanted to move back to Illinois.

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          • Easy E
            Easy E commented
            Editing a comment
            Reminds me of a quote in the movie The Polka King from SEC Investigator Ron Edwards played by J.B. Smoove that I will paraphrase:

            "Everyone is always complaining about how their taxes are too high, or the government is useless. Then, they get swindled out of their life savings in an attempt to avoid paying their fair share, and guess who they come begging to for help? The Government. "

            Great line.

        • #7
          It’s pretty much a global issue,

          London is a major issue, particularly as a lot of property is tied up in shady tax dodging deals, and just sit empty. As people develop their careers and earn more, they tend to move out to where I am, increasing the prices there.

          If I went to Wales or The North, I could easily afford a pretty decent house. But, there just aren’t the same job options there.

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          • #8
            Originally posted by Mad Doc Grotsnik View Post
            It’s pretty much a global issue,

            London is a major issue, particularly as a lot of property is tied up in shady tax dodging deals, and just sit empty. As people develop their careers and earn more, they tend to move out to where I am, increasing the prices there.

            If I went to Wales or The North, I could easily afford a pretty decent house. But, there just aren’t the same job options there.
            The available facilities are also markedly reduced, especially public transit. I grew up on the edge of North Wales. You can still drive for two hours to the Welsh coast and see little more than farmland for the entire journey. If you aren't farming, there is very little work in that area, and supermarkets etc are hard to find.

            My parents house is a good 10 miles from the nearest town. If you don't have a car, the options for buying food locally are basically non-existent and the nearest bus stop is a mile away with 4 buses a day and no buses Sunday. The cheaper housing is offset by the expense of getting to work and buying goods and accessing services like dentists, and running a car is pretty expensive in the UK.

            Of course, at some point the council thought it wise to hide patches of council housing out this way, so there are groups of poor folk trapped out in the sticks with little work opportunities and high travel costs.

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            • #9
              South West villages are also suffering, due to second home owners. Basically, folk with more money are buy second homes in very pretty villages. This increases local housing costs, without the benefit of having wealthy folks living in the area and spending said wealth.

              So you end up with high prices the locals just cannot afford.

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              • #10
                But wait, I thought the high prices were from the poor people making too much.

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