Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Mercs are Easy to Find Now

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Mercs are Easy to Find Now

    After the assassination in Haiti, it was revealed that many of the people involved were ex-Colombian soldiers and other mercenaries/security contractors. I found this an interesting "Hot Take" on the assassination:

    https://slate.com/news-and-politics/...ever-wars.html

    Mercenaries Are a Growing Labor Pool

    According to initial reports, a small private security company in Miami hired for the Haiti operation roughly 20 former soldiers from Colombia, all of whom had served in the country’s elite special forces. (It’s not clear quite how much the contractors knew about what they were being asked to do before they signed up—media reports suggest they may have thought they were going to provide security for Haitian VIPs—or what actual role they played in the assassination.) The Pentagon confirmed on Thursday that at least some of the men, who have now all been taken into custody or killed, received U.S. training, part of America’s decades-long support of the Colombian military.

    The involvement of private contractors is reminiscent of some other recent coup attempts, including the 2004 “Wonga Coup,” in which a group of South African mercenaries financed by Margaret Thatcher’s son attempted to overthrow the government of Equatorial Guinea, and last year’s “Bar of Piglets” fiasco in which a former Green Beret-turned-security contractor mounted a ludicrously unsuccessful invasion of Venezuela. In Haiti, the contractors got much closer to achieving their goal: They killed Moïse, though it’s not really clear what step 2 was supposed to be.
    Also.....

    Sean McFate, a former U.S. Army officer who worked as a private military contractor in several countries in Africa and now teaches at Georgetown’s School of Foreign Service, says Colombians are a popular option for those in the market for hired guns for two main reasons: They are very good and relatively cheap. “They are about half to a quarter of the price of an American or U.K. mercenary,” he says. “They’ve all got combat experience against the FARC and Narcos. Many of them were trained by U.S. Green Berets. They’re disciplined, effective warriors.”

    **************

    For McFate, the Moïse assassination illustrates the risks of allowing the industry to grow unfettered. “It’s what happens when you use mercenaries as we have been over the past 30 years. What happens to out-of-work mercenaries? They seek out new contracts. They’re a growing labor pool,” he says. “We’re going to be seeing more of this as the years go on. There will be private citizens who hire mercenaries to do these things. This is not an isolated incident.”
    There you go. I guess the market for Mercenaries is flush with applicants with the skills to pay the bills. They are all looking for work now.

  • #2
    Mercs boggle my fucking mind. National service is one thing, king and country and all that if that's your bag, but to get shot at for a fucking paycheck is INSANE.

    Comment


    • #3
      It's what US kids have been doing for decades now. I'm sure there's a handful that doesn't join because of poverty and poor education options, so let's not pretend the US military isn't already doing that.
      Anyway, good thing no one on the right hired some this january, or they might've succeeded in actually harming people.

      Comment


      • #4
        Yes, the US military is a racket, but ostensibly people join up for patriotic reasons. We can't say the same for Black Rock et al.

        Comment


        • #5
          Metal Gear Solid once again proves too accurate to real life.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by feeder View Post
            Mercs boggle my fucking mind. National service is one thing, king and country and all that if that's your bag, but to get shot at for a fucking paycheck is INSANE.
            I'd rather get Shot at for money than for King. But that is preference of ideology. Jokes aside though this is a effect of national acteurs influence and participation waneing and supranational /international structures and acteurs joining the fray far more often, which have to rely on mercs or ideological supporters.
            Also mercs don't strain a society, and have other political advantages... Like f.e. not being of the Nation they Fight for, private interests to hide nations interventions in other nations, manpower...
            ​​​​

            Edit: russia/ Putin the Parade exemple of ethno claiming other countries, has friends that are close with the GRU which have private armies in the Central african Republic called "Gruppe Wagner" which has a strength of over 3500 men alone.
            that is sizeable .
            Last edited by Online; 07-19-2021, 09:07 PM.

            Comment


            • #7
              Point of fact,a lot of the guys who join the reputable merc outfits (excuse me, 'private security contractors' or 'private military contractors' these days) are typically former military. Some skills do not translate well to the civilian job market. On the flip side, some of the shittier ones will take anyone who's willing to kill for money.


              Mercs have never been hard to find, it just takes the right amount of money and a word in the right ear, and you can have a private army, complete with close air support and armored vehicles.

              Comment


              • Shinypixe
                Shinypixe commented
                Editing a comment
                "reputable"

              • BaronIveagh
                BaronIveagh commented
                Editing a comment
                Reputation is important if you want jobs from Governments. And, remember, it's a lot less controversial at home when a bunch of mercs buy it then when the neighbor's kid comes home in a body bag after being deployed to some hell hole.

            • #8
              Oh hey, the assassins were graduates of the School of the Americas. Who here is surprised.

              Comment


              • #9
                Originally posted by Online View Post
                I'd rather get Shot at for money than for King.
                Yeah but it's basically part of your national heritage to fight for money amirite ;) ?

                Originally posted by BaronIveagh View Post
                And, remember, it's a lot less controversial at home when a bunch of mercs buy it then when the neighbor's kid comes home in a body bag after being deployed to some hell hole.
                I hear that often but I'm not very clear on this. Does the mercenary have less family? Don't they live in a neighborhood?
                Honestly, having mercenary means having less oversight, and therefore higher chances of stuff like, you know, war crimes. Which I would expect would look pretty bad, but Trump proved that no, at least the republican side of the US thinks war crimes are great when they happen to other people.

                Comment


                • #10
                  Originally posted by OgorOrukOomanDuardin View Post
                  Yeah but it's basically part of your national heritage to fight for money amirite ;) ?
                  there were a few in my family tree. But then again when stuck over here for what now... some 650+ years and the context of it being one of the main exports of switzerland for some 200-400 years... yeah...

                  I hear that often but I'm not very clear on this. Does the mercenary have less family? Don't they live in a neighborhood?
                  Honestly, having mercenary means having less oversight, and therefore higher chances of stuff like, you know, war crimes. Which I would expect would look pretty bad, but Trump proved that no, at least the republican side of the US thinks war crimes are great when they happen to other people.


                  modern mercenaries are often missfits, andventurers and criminals.
                  You can check the "personell" from the French foreign legion for their backgrounds.
                  These are people that are "not missed" so to speak, as for warcrimes, it depends entirely on the outfit. State acteurs like Wagner don't bother hiding, respectively they have a type of protection in russia.
                  French foreign legion, exists to sap manpower, otoh is bound by the french public as a controll instance, other companies, depend upon the availability of ressources to them... cluster bombs nowadays don't really get sold anymore. Also their discipline will also vary greatly probably. Like it always did.

                  Comment


                  • #11
                    Originally posted by OgorOrukOomanDuardin View Post
                    I hear that often but I'm not very clear on this. Does the mercenary have less family? Don't they live in a neighborhood?
                    Honestly, having mercenary means having less oversight, and therefore higher chances of stuff like, you know, war crimes. Which I would expect would look pretty bad, but Trump proved that no, at least the republican side of the US thinks war crimes are great when they happen to other people.

                    Frequently those families are not in the countries at war. The general public cares a lot less about casualties when it's foreigners getting paid who do the dying, and generally speaking, it's assumed that all mercenaries are foreigners, regardless of the facts of the matter.

                    And, bluntly, discipline and oversight can vary wildly. England and France give them quite strict oversight, and have military commands who's entire purpose is to oversee mercenaries as though they were part of their regular armed forces. The CIA, not so much.
                    Last edited by BaronIveagh; 07-22-2021, 07:48 PM.

                    Comment


                    • #12
                      Originally posted by Online View Post
                      You can check the "personell" from the French foreign legion for their backgrounds.
                      I got two members of my family that are in the FFL.
                      The FFL may fit the definition of mercenaries, but they don't feel like mercenaries to me. They only have one employer, the French state, and they got oversight from French officer, and they are just basically a specific branch of the French army. They don't look for contracts, the officers are recruited the same way as the rest of the French military, …
                      I mean, if some members of the FFL commits a war crime, he'll get a military trial like any other member of the military, unlike US “PMC”, and it'll be reported in the news as “A soldier committed a war crime” not “A mercenary committed a war crime.”
                      Sure, the legionaries are not regular soldiers, but the whole thing is kinda supposed to integrate them in French society (weird I know, but they get a French nationality along with retirement).
                      Compare this to PMC that are basically “Yeah, let's just delegate our war problem to the private sector” and it's a big difference.

                      Comment


                      • #13
                        Originally posted by OgorOrukOomanDuardin View Post
                        I got two members of my family that are in the FFL.
                        The FFL may fit the definition of mercenaries, but they don't feel like mercenaries to me. They only have one employer, the French state, and they got oversight from French officer, and they are just basically a specific branch of the French army. They don't look for contracts, the officers are recruited the same way as the rest of the French military, …
                        I mean, if some members of the FFL commits a war crime, he'll get a military trial like any other member of the military, unlike US “PMC”, and it'll be reported in the news as “A soldier committed a war crime” not “A mercenary committed a war crime.”
                        Sure, the legionaries are not regular soldiers, but the whole thing is kinda supposed to integrate them in French society (weird I know, but they get a French nationality along with retirement).
                        Compare this to PMC that are basically “Yeah, let's just delegate our war problem to the private sector” and it's a big difference.
                        Oh no, they are simply "NOT"- mercenaries insofar as they get integrated into french society for legal reasons, however that is an artificial trick to bypass anti mercenary legislation, not least of which the swiss one for that matter. Quite frankly its a bit of a hot iron historically over here and considered ilegitimate, not least of which because it also makes it look like france just wants some cannonfodder without the negatives from losses, and it did on occaision piss off locals. Also they did some rather questionable things in algeria and vietnam, so stating they are somehow above PMC is nonsense aswell, indeed most PMC's have probably done less criminal activity then the FFL.
                        Last edited by Online; 07-23-2021, 07:53 AM.

                        Comment


                        • #14
                          Originally posted by Online View Post
                          Also they did some rather questionable things in algeria and vietnam
                          Under direct command from French military officers you mean?

                          Originally posted by Online View Post
                          so stating they are somehow above PMC is nonsense aswell, indeed most PMC's have probably done less criminal activity then the FFL.
                          Most PMC have done less criminal activity than most armies because most PMC have existed for a much shorter timeframe and most armies have done pretty bad things.

                          Comment


                          • #15
                            Originally posted by OgorOrukOomanDuardin View Post
                            Most PMC have done less criminal activity than most armies because most PMC have existed for a much shorter timeframe and most armies have done pretty bad things.
                            That's... debatable. Other than Paladin, the FFL was one of the few mercenary organizations to actively recruit Germans, mostly for service in Indochina. The Legion didn't crack down on former SS men joining the Legion until 1947, due to the number of Legionaries that had been forced to serve the German 361st Motorised Infantry Regiment, leading to an old joke among mercs that Dien Bien Phu was the true last stand of the Luftwaffe.

                            .

                            Last edited by BaronIveagh; 07-23-2021, 04:05 PM.

                            Comment

                            Working...
                            X