Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

The Great Office Return

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #46
    My place had an update the other day following the Gov announcement that 19th July is going ahead. I think many companies with a risk-strategy review and legal department, and that have a large IT-element (or where the job can be carried out practicably regardless of location) are going along similar lines. Despite the 19th July restriction removals
    - Continue to work from home if at all possible
    - If you need to attend an office all Covid protocols to remain in place (inc. mask wearing, social distancing etc, temperature check upon entering the building).

    Comment


    • #47
      I can see a lot of companies ignoring the Government relaxations and remaining cautious.

      In Scotland, we're dropping to level 0 from the 19th but the Government advise is still to work from home where possible.

      Comment


      • #48
        My Company just announced Home Office folks in Boston to start returning to the office in September. It will be a Hybrid model for now.

        They are not mandating vaccinations. Those that are not vaccinated need to take "additional precautions", whatever that means.......

        Thankfully, I do not work at Home Office in Boston and can continue to WFH. The groups going back are primarily finance, real estate, marketing, buyers, etc.

        Comment


        • #49
          Easy E - I am so surprised the US of all places is taking that route. Where will they stand with legal actions around catching the virus at work?

          Example: person A - has not been immunised for health reasons or perhaps has yet to have it but wants to. Person B - carrying the virus, passes it to person A who becomes sick or dies.
          Could you not say that the workplace has not taken all adequate steps as vaccines aren't mandated, and obviously additional precautions were not followed?

          Where would things then stand from an employment law but also health insurance point of view? Surely that would have 'lawsuit' written all over it.

          Comment


          • #50
            There is no good way to trace the source of the infection and therefore Plausible Deniability is the key to stave off lawsuits. The fig leaf of procedure and policy that is not enforced is probably enough protection.

            Comment


            • #51
              Originally posted by Easy E View Post
              There is no good way to trace the source of the infection and therefore Plausible Deniability is the key to stave off lawsuits. The fig leaf of procedure and policy that is not enforced is probably enough protection.
              The standard in civil cases is on balance of probability, so greater than 50% chance.

              I think that may be a low enough bar that people could succeed in a suit. I'm sure people will try!

              Comment


              • #52
                If I had to hazard a guess, I would say it's a matter of 'when' rather than 'if' some kind of lawsuit happens. Because at some point someone will get sick because they were in the office, lose their job or capacity to work, or they will die, and then because of those lost earnings a lawsuit would be the only way to get something back from that.

                Originally posted by Easy E View Post
                There is no good way to trace the source of the infection and therefore Plausible Deniability is the key to stave off lawsuits. The fig leaf of procedure and policy that is not enforced is probably enough protection.
                Although I've read reports of some instances of transmission where they have managed to trace it back to the exat point of infection; that included two people passing each other closely in a shopping mall and also germs left on a door handle (Australia), being sat in a restaurant and it passing from an upstairs ventilation system and also being sat in a particular seat in a Church service (someone came and sat in the chair afterwards and picked up the virus) - I think those were S Korea.
                So it is possible to trace to that level, but perhaps only when you have very isolated cases? If you're saying 1 in 200 or even 1 in 100 people have the virus, and it is literally just everywhere, I guess it's that much more difficult to trace it back (and actually prove it).

                Comment


                • #53
                  And this is before you factor in employees, managers or bosses who are in the "It's a PLANdemic, sheeple!" club. I'm not sure I want to be in an enclosed office with a circulating air conditioning system with such people.

                  Comment


                  • #54
                    Originally posted by RedChimera View Post
                    And this is before you factor in employees, managers or bosses who are in the "It's a PLANdemic, sheeple!" club. I'm not sure I want to be in an enclosed office with a circulating air conditioning system with such people.
                    This is where it helps to work for a company that is large enough to have a legal department and a dedicated Health & Safety team, which carries out its own independent risk assessments.

                    Think if you're in a smaller company with a megalomaniacal boss you're a lot more vulnerable. An acquaintance of mine has been going into the office through I think all but the first lockdown to write emails, because her boss doesn't believe in the virus. I'm not sure quite sure how I would cope with that shit!

                    Comment


                    • #55
                      My company is doing a hybrid thing as well - in 2 days a week, remote the rest; transitioning to 3 days in/2 out in August. Not sure how long that is going to hold up with Delta. It's really nice being able to work remote - I have only been able to do it consistently since switching to a new role about a month ago.

                      Prior to that, I was an essential worker and had to go in for pretty much the whole pandemic. Once things started getting better, my company sent my entire department to India, which made me feel pretty good about the last 15 months of risking my health going in person without any PPE and with some of the most boneheaded "protections" imaginable.

                      Comment


                      • #56
                        The great office return for my place has been abruptly aborted Friday evening - there is a mask mandate for anyone coming into one of the company facilities, and they eliminated "required days in the office", which means (nearly) all of us will be remote again.

                        I feel very lucky to have the kind of job I can do 100% from home.

                        Comment


                        • #57
                          Current expectations of both me and my partner's universities is that we will be obliged to revert to full online teaching by semester two (beginning January) if not before.

                          Formal position remains that we'll do small group teaching in person and lectures online until further notice.

                          Comment


                          • #58
                            I am curious how the new US mask guidelines is impacting the Great Office Return around your area?

                            Ours look like they are still on BUT they are requiring everyone to provide their Vaccine cards? This surprised me considering there is a lot of political backlash in the US around the very concept of a "vaccine passport".

                            Comment


                            • #59
                              Originally posted by Easy E View Post
                              I am curious how the new US mask guidelines is impacting the Great Office Return around your area?

                              Ours look like they are still on BUT they are requiring everyone to provide their Vaccine cards? This surprised me considering there is a lot of political backlash in the US around the very concept of a "vaccine passport".

                              At my org masks are required if you are in a company facility, but in my area (IT) we're nearly all remote again now.

                              I don't foresee us ever requiring a vaccine passport - it's a very conservative workforce and they would rebel, I think. We're already bleeding staff because of some other decisions the company made.

                              Comment


                              • #60
                                I only got back once or twice before policy reversed and we all went home again.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X